Tuesday, May 19, 2020

The Sound of a Podcast


I'd almost forgotten what a ripping yarn this is. Rosemary Puddy who runs thebookpodcast has rerecorded my interview with her from a few years ago. Have a listen. It's great.
Here is the link: https://bit.ly/TBP019

10 comments:

  1. Yeh, I liked that. I got to know you a little bit more through listening to your voice and, of course, what you are saying. I understand exactly what you mean about the setting, the place and the landscape always comes first. It is like that here for the people where I live and where I grew up, it is the place that makes us who we are, what we are, and what we do. Nice to hear the blog mentioned too and how it fitted in the journey. Thanks for sharing it.

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  2. Thanks for listening Rachel, and your feedback. I think it was the first time I've heard it, I had the cringe originally.

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  3. Hi Sarah, I was thinking of you! I dont know if you follow Roz Butterworth Boorloo Boodja on facebook? she has unearthed the Noongar name Maynebelup for Broke Inlet from William Nairne Clark 1842 expedition notes https://www.facebook.com/LostWadjuk

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    1. Hi Michelle - Anthropology from the shed is another awesome facebook page to follow https://www.facebook.com/anthropology01

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  4. Hi Lowlands, I'm not on FB but was able to access this page. Amazing work by Roz. On the old maps, Broke is called Mainbechup, so similar ... it would be good to get a Noongar naming crew onto it. Originally the idea that it was named after the bloodroot (sp. spicatum) but that may be incorrect. Not sure.

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    1. Hi Sarah, this is Sheila (from our zoom tutor meetings and other places!), (not sure how I ended up on Blogger as Lowlands Beach anonymously - all my other social media has far too much info about me!). Good that you had Broke name - It is interesting that consonants get changed - when I was looking for Mt Hallowell, Nakina guided John Septimus Roe at Mt Hallowell in 1831, giving Roe the Aboriginal name Koo run lup, but when Migo guided Roe in 1835, Roe recorded the name as a Koo run tup. Barker has the name Co man dyup, from Marignan (Marignan is one of
      Mokare's cousins). The Denmark dual naming project has Koo rum dinup - You are absolutely right about getting a Noongar naming crew onto it

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    2. Great work you are doing Sheila. Yes, so many things go missing in translation. I find many Noongar names on old maps that have been erased in more recent years. Mt Frankland has Caldyenup on the old maps and Boorabunnup for Mt Roe.
      Have you worked with Len at all? He's good at backtracking using linguistics and history. Issues like Kinjarling can kinda jam up discussion too. It seems like once things are written down by the colonists, they become set in stone and if they are incorrect, then it's so difficult to undo.
      You'd know more than me on this topic. Would it be possible that a place had several names, more verb based, as in the functions the country performed at different times of year?

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  5. Great interview Sarah. Did I miss the book you referred to at the end?

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    1. I think that was a poor joke Michelle. She asked how far away my next book was and I said, 'About a hundred kilometres.'

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